Pulling God’s Teeth: Book One of The Last Italian, A Saga in Three Parts by Anthony Delstretto
Book description / October 17, 2019

PULLING GOD’S TEETH is the first volume of The Last Italian, A Saga in Three Parts, a gripping tale that begins in 1882, in Italy, and spans more than six decades of social and political tumult. Three generations of the Como and Vacci families face rapacious landowners, deadly epidemics, harrowing warfare, perilous immigration, and fascist brutality during the Kingdom of Italy’s final sixty-three turbulent years. Throughout, as the characters balance their commitments to love, loyalty, and honor against the implacable demands of physical survival, Fate forever stands ready to abruptly intervene. The other books of the trilogy include: BOOK TWO: FATE’S RESTLESS FEET (1911-1913) BOOK THREE: DEATH TO THE WOLF (1942-1945) PULLING GOD’S TEETH (1882-1886) Twenty-four-year-old Carlo Como goes out fishing one dawn on the wide river near his northern Italian village of Castrubello. The Pirino has provided a living for the Como family for generations, but this morning Carlo hauls in a very different catch: three large white rocks known as “God’s Teeth.” The valuable stones, coveted by local ceramic-makers, will allow him to marry his love, Tonia Vacci, a worker in the town’s dismal silk mill. But the fisherman’s good fortune is resented by estate manager Baldassare Gaetano,…

Review Country of Ash by Edward Reicher
Biography , Book reviews / August 8, 2013

To read this book, you should have an iron stomach. You’ll have to be very strong to bear the intense emotions you’ll feel when you keep in your hands Country of Ash, an historical and biographical book written by Edward Reicher, a Jewish doctor, dermatologist and physician lived in Poland during Nazi occupation lasted from 1939 to 1945. The book is subtitled just “A Jewish Doctor in Poland 1939-1945“. This tale moved me why is focused on a terrible event of history, a fact where millions of people died. This tragic event is named Holocaust. The author tells his tragic experience in the Lodz Ghetto, a zone where Reicher lived with his wife Pola and his little daughter Elizabeth, called only Elzunia. Through 253 pages Reicher gives a compelling account of the destruction of the Warsaw Ghetto and offers us a story that looks like a fiction or a movie but that is awfully true. The tragedy of Poland and Reicher’s family began a hot evening of autumn in 1939, when German air forces destroyed the zone around Lodz, a country where Reicher was born and lived. That day, nobody could imagine what would happen. The buildings and the houses…